Welcome

I believe that history and heritage are valuable, and that gentility among people is still the "currency of the realm." I believe in the solid principles that have been passed down from generation to generation; that there is value in a man's word, that there is goodness in the hearts of all men, and that a knowledge of the woods, fields, lakes, rivers, oceans, and the creatures and crops we find there, makes us better stewards of God's amazing earth!

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Spring is in the air...

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Although it may only be the 31st of January, Spring is certainly in the air here in North Carolina, and by spring, I do mean - SPRING!  Perhaps it's the streak of at or above 70 degree days, but it seems as though I should be out at the lake (with my son) Crappie fishing.  This unusually warm weather has me thinking about turkey hunting, fresh produce, vacations to the beach, fishing trips, shooting sporting clays until well after dinner time, and all other manner of outdoor pursuits! I know that I'm getting ahead of myself, for as I've already stated, it is only the 31st of January...still lots of time for old man winter to make a comeback.  Just wishing that he wouldn't.

Until Next Time -
D-

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Across Regional Lines

I love my Southen Heritage, but if there's one area that I love almost as much as my beloved Southeastern United States, it's the Adirondack region of NY.  It has such an amazing sporting heritage.  First explored by European hunters in 1573, the region has had a profound influence on sporting lifestyles throughout the United States.  One of its primary influences (Architecture) was developed by William West Durant...son of Dr. Thomas Clark Durant (one of the original 12 Robber Barons - who's Union Pacific Railroad was the eastern half of the original transcontinental railroad)...Because of Dr. Durant's land grants from the U.S. government (to build the railroad) he had land holdings in the Adirondack region that totaled more land than the entire state of Connecticut.  It was out of these vast holdings that his son W.W. Durant developed the Adirondack, Great Camps (Pine Knot, Uncas, and Sagamore) and subsequently the Adirondack style of architecture that is still influencing rural and sporting structures to this day.  It focuses on the use of native materials - a rugged but comfortable feel, and a sensibility that encompasses both form and function. It truly is a fantastic look into our past, and at the same time, quite possibly a look ahead to our future.

Until Next Time -

D-









Saturday, January 21, 2012

Holland & Holland - Video

This Holland & Holland video is great! Had a nice e-mail exchange with the fellow (Mr. Billy Payn) over in the U.K. who made it for H&H.  What fantastic firearms and bespoke sporting attire ... Craftsmanship still counts!


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Friday, January 20, 2012

AND AWAY WE GO...

Well, I'm not sure whether anyone other than me will wind up reading my modest offering on this blog site, but if you do, great... if not, then this will be nothing more than a cathartic means by which I will long for (and strive to implement in my own life) the values of a bygone era...  A time when we were more "in tune" with our natural surroundings...when men and women knew what it meant to be not only good neighbors to each other, but also good stewards of the land.  I admire those who, without modern conveniences, knew how to make the best of difficult times and still maintain  a level of civility not seen in our modern era.  It's a time to be looked upon with great admiration and strived for in our increasingly "wired in" society.

In this blog I will seek out the best of what is out there for gentlemen, sportsmen, and those who enjoy working with the land.  I will try my best to get content that will not only prove to be entertaining but will also provide useful information that you (or me, if I'm my only reader)  can apply to modern life.  So with that, I'm off to being scouring the Internet and libraries for such items.   Until next time...

David J. Jeffries, II